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US carriers close security loophole that allowed easy SMS hijack

$16 and a lie or two is all it takes to reroute your incoming text messages

Your phone and its associated number are always with you, and only you, so it makes sense that a text message sent to you is a solid secondary method for authenticating a login. But savvy tech users know this method of verification is rife for exploitation: SIM jacking, SS7 attacks, and other hacking methods are now common. A recent investigation showed that it’s possible to perform similar attacks with readily-available marketing tools, with the victim none the wiser.

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US carriers close security loophole that allowed easy SMS hijack was written by the awesome team at Android Police.